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Organized by
Victoria University of Wellington,
New Zealand
Co-Sponsored by
IEEE SMC Society
CSCWD International Working Group
Committees
General Conference Chair
Pedro Antunes (New Zealand)
Conference Co-Chairs
José A. Pino (Chile)
Yun Yang (Australia)
Anne James (UK)
Jano de Souza (Brazil)
Amy Trappey (Taiwan)
Pedro Antunes (New Zealand)
Program Committee Chairs
Weiming Shen (Canada)
Jean-Paul Barthès (France)
Junzhou Luo (China)
Jianming Yong (Australia)
Publicity Chairs
Andreas Drechsler (New Zealand)
Ijeoma Enwereuzo (New Zealand)
Publication Chair
Nguyen Hoang Thuan (New Zealand)
Finance Chair / Treasurer
Yi-Te Chiu (New Zealand)
Local Arrangement Chair
Markus Luczak-Roesch (New Zealand)
International Steering Committee
Co-Chairs
Jean-Paul Barthès (France)
Junzhou Luo (China)
Weiming Shen (Canada)
Secretary
Jianming Yong (Australia)
Members
Pedro Antunes (New Zealand)
Marcos Borges (Brazil)
Kuo-Ming Chao (UK)
Jano de Souza (Brazil)
Giancarlo Fortino (Italy)
Liang Gao (China)
Ning Gu (China)
Anne James (UK)
Peter Kropf (Switzerland)
Weidong Li (UK)
Xiaoping P. Liu (Canada)
Hwa Gyoo Park (Korea)
José A. Pino (Chile)
Amy Trappey (Taiwan)
Yun Yang (Australia)

Keynote Speakers

(In alphabetical order)


Professor Chengzheng Sun, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Chengzheng Sun

Short bio

Dr. Chengzheng Sun is a full professor in the School of Computer Science and Engineering at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (www.ntu.edu.sg/home/czsun). In over two decades, Dr Sun has been an active researcher, leader and chief designer of a number of collaborative editing system projects, including CoWord, CoPowerPoint, CoMaya, etc. and the underlying Operational Transformation (OT) technology, which have made important contributions to the theory and practical implementation of collaborative editing systems. He has also acted as an advisor for several industrial collaborative editing projects. Prof Sun obtained a PhD in computer engineering from National University of Defense Technology, China in 1987, and a PhD in computer science from the University of Amsterdam, Netherlands in 1992. His current research lies at the intersections of Computer-Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) and distributed/cloud computing systems. Dr Sun has published extensively and delivered seminars and tutorials on collaborative editing techniques and systems widely at major international conferences, universities, and industrial research labs.

Keynote: Collaborative Editing Research: from Academic Curiosity to Real-World Application

Nowadays, collaborative editing systems, such Google Docs, Microsoft Office Online, Dropbox Paper, Box Notes, and CodoxWave (supporting read-time editing in a wide range of existing web browser-based editors, including Gmail, Wikipedia, Evernote, and WordPress), are ubiquitous and commonly used by hundreds of millions of people around the world. Research on collaborative editing, however, started in the 80s of the last century as a niche area (with a small number of persistent researchers) in the field of Computer-Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW), and was initially driven mainly by academic curiosity. This niche area has been continuously evolving for over 3 decades and eventually resulted in a large scale adoption in major industry products in recent years. In this talk, the speaker will review the history of collaborative editing research and development, including representative academic research projects, industrial products, and open source projects. He will also share his insights on conducting impactful research in this area, and on current trends, opportunities and challenges in future collaborative editing research and real-world applications.


Professor Jan Recker, Queensland University of Technology, Australia

Jan Recker

Short bio

Jan Recker is Alexander-von-Humboldt Fellow and Full Professor at the QUT Business School at Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia. At QUT he held the inaugural Woolworths Chair of Retail Innovation and now leads the Digital Innovation Research Group. His research focuses on Digital Innovation, Environmental Sustainability and Systems Analysis & Design. His research has appeared in AoM Discoveries, MIS Quarterly, Journal of the AIS, Information Systems Journal, European Journal of IS, Journal of IT, Decision Support Systems, IEEE IT Professional, and other journals. He is Editor-in-Chief of the Communications of the Association for Information Systems, and Associate Editor for the MIS Quarterly.

Keynote: The Complexities of Sustainability and Design: How sustainable are our systems designs? Can we design systems for sustainability?

Systems design is complex to begin with but even more so when requirements of 'sustainable design' are added. This notion is of particular relevant to communities interested in building systems that contribute to greening the planet, i.e., with environmental sustainability of technology-based systems. The solution potential of such 'sustainability systems' is immense but impact to date is sparse. Industry scandals like the Dieselgate affair also demonstrate the relevance, complexities and intricacies associated with such systems. In this keynote I will critically review systems design research concerned with sustainability. I will point to several challenges and problems that hamper progress and then present new insights into the ongoing development of a meaningful 'grand' theory of sustainable systems design with prescriptive design principles that can hopefully lead to more impactful solution-oriented systems design research on sustainability.


Professor Jose A. Pino, University of Chile, Chile

Jose A. Pino

Short bio

Jose A. Pino is a full professor of Computer Science at the University of Chile. His research interests include ubiquitous computing, human-computer interaction, and socio-technical systems. He has served as President of the Chilean Computer Science Society (SCCC) and President of CLEI (the Latin American Association of Universities Concerning Information Technology). He has co-authored six books and published research papers in international conferences and journals, including Journal of the ACM, Communications of the ACM, ACM Computing Surveys, Decision Support Systems, Group Decision and Negotiation, and Future Generation Computer Systems. He is currently a member of the Editorial Boards of the Journal of Network and Computer Applications and the Journal of Educational Technology and Society. He is a member of the CSCWD Conference Steering Committee.

Keynote: Crime Prediction using Patterns and Context

Science fiction had anticipated the prediction of future occurrence of crimes. In fact, that prediction is actually possible. It can be done with some imprecision and by computer algorithms using available data from various sources. The prediction involves approximate time and place of occurrence of certain type of felonies such as home burglaries, armed robberies and violent thefts. The police can then use this information for increasing their patrolling accordingly and thereby reducing the crime occurrence rate.

We present a crime prediction solution developed for Chilean large cities. Its novel approach includes three independent software modules which make predictions based on different algorithms. The final prediction is the cooperative integration of the individual ones. The developed system has been tested on historical data and its performance has been considered acceptable for police field use. An interesting result is that the performance of each individual module is inferior to the joint performance, validating a hypothesis that different algorithms may exploit different features of the available data.